Posts Tagged With: Too Fat Lardies

Hood’s Battery

I have been working with an idea for a “Pint Sized” campaign for the Too Fat Lardies game Sharp Practice for some time. Last night I ran what would be the first scenario for my club, The Williamsburg Legati.

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This campaign centers upon the action of Benedict Arnold leading an army of mostly loyalist forces in my area of Virginia at the beginning of 1781.  Not completely trusted by Clinton yet, the former American hero was sent to Williamsburg to build a defensible port for British efforts to deny efforts to support General Green in the Carolinas, as well as to disrupt lines of supply and destroy stores of war material.

His ships were spotted coming into the area and the word was sent to Governor Jefferson, who feared that they might really be French Allies decided to do nothing until their identity was confirmed.

Arnold brought with him the Hessian and Anspach foot  Jagers sptsin Ewald, The 80th Regiment, under the Command of Lt Col Dundas,  The Queen’s Rangers commanded by Lt Simcoe, Robinson’s Corps (Loyal American Regiment) commanded by Major Robinson,  The Althause Sharpshooters (Company of York Volunteers), A Company of Royal Artillery and 100 Pioneers.

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A real advantage to playing this campaign is that two of the commanders wrote memoirs that survive.  Captain Ewald, who had command of Hessian Jaegers, and Lt Colonel Simcoe of the Queen’s Rangers. Ewals also made a number of maps which decorate this post.

After landing at Portsmouth, Arnold quickly sailed up the James towards the New Virginia Capital at Richmond. After a failed attempt to land near Jamestown, Arnold continued to sail westward. Where he encountered Hood’s battery.

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Artillery had been placed upon the bluff to stop British vessels from sailing up the river to bombard Richmond.  Arnold needed to remove this battery.  Ewald Jaegers and either the Grenadiers and the Light of the 80th or the Queens Rangers, depending upon which memoir you believe, landed at Wards Creek where the ships are shown on the map above.  From here about a mile from the battery, they marched around the flank to attack the unprotected rear.  The Americans, having spotted the landing boats, fled, leaving the guns to the mercy of the enemy.

This does not a good wargame make.  For this campaign I have decided to propose a “what if” aspect.  The fictio0n of this campaign, is that Jefferson responds by ordering reinforcements be raised, and for some of the Virginia State Line, being raised and trained by Baron Von Steuben to be sent to the Carolinas, be diverted to face a new threat.

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The Americans were defending the battery with two groups of Militia as well as to groups of these Virginia State line.  They also had two groups of militia skirmishers.  for support, they chose an explorer scout and a marksman specialist.

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The British were mostly Queen’s Rangers.  Two groups of line and two groups of Skirmishers.  Ewald was represented by a group of Jaeger skirmishers which they choose to further support by spending their points an a second.

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Early on, the Americans took a strong flank position with their militia skirmishers, much to the chagrin of a local farmwife.  They also dispatched some of their line militia to try to figure out how to turn and load some of the guns.

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The Hessians also had flanks on their mind, and they used their rifles to good effect, safely outside their opponent’s musket range.

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Here things got difficult for the British.  Although inexperienced as artillerymen, the militia at the guns, aided by the withering fire of their comrades still in line,  had a devastating effect on the main body of the Queen’s Rangers, The slowly fell back and eventually one group broke.  That combined with a lack of red cards left the British forces frozen in the field and exposed.

In the end, everyone had a good time, but those guns were an issue.  Now that I look at Ewals map, I think I will leave the actual battery of the table, and center the fight on the redoubt instead.

until next time, Cheers,

Ron

 

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Categories: American Revolution, Sharp Practice, Too Fat Lardies, Wargaming, Williamsburg Legati | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

Hell and Heroism at Hannut, by way of Historicon 2018

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Today brought the end of the 2018 Historicon up in Lancaster, PA.  As Lard America was participating with a Lard day, with guest of honor and Lard Meister Richard Clarke himself attending OI though perhaps I had better go.  Glad I did.

I decided to put on  Hell and Heroism at Hannut by Ben Fiene.  This was a three scenario mini campaign printed in the Too Fat Lardies Christmas Special from 2013.  These are three linked by theme only scenarios depicting some of the action at Hannut.  It also is rather atypical of Chain of Command.

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The first scenario Chaos and Confusion, has an interesting beginning set up.  Basically it is May 11th 1940.  A recon platoon of  of 3e DLM is ordered forward to probe the area around the Albert Canal.  Unbeknownst to the French the canal was already seized by the Germans about 24 hours previously.  The platoon’s commander,  Sous Lieutenant de Vasselot dismounts from his Panhard to speak with a Belgian officer.  As he approached he realized the uniform is wrong, this is the enemy!  They both go for their sidearms but the French man is a little faster and the Hun falls.

So begins the battle.  The French have three Panhards and a squad of motorcycles, the third panhard and the motorcycles are detached and will arrive later.  The French , must hold the ground waiting for the missing armored car to return and then they must report back by exiting from the side they entered on.

The Germans  have a Panzer Grenadier platoon but their Commanding officer begins the game dead.   To represent their confusion over this misshap, they not only are limited to one Senior Leader but they also are operating on only 4 command dice.  Their orders are to stop the French from reporting back.

This is clearly a hard task for the Germans as most of their weapons will do little against the Panhards.  Playtesting by Matthew Mattic on Facebook caused him to suggest the addition of a PAK 36 and requiring that the French were at force morale 4 or higher when exiting to win.  This advice was heeded.

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Germans maneuvering through the orchard

Turned out the Anti Tank Gun did little.  The village on the French side of the table provided sufficient cover, blocking the gun’s line of sight.  Shots were exchanged on both sides but casualties were light.

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Panhards Holding the Crossroads

 

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Germans reach the Outskirts of the Village

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When the missing French detachment arrived this would change.  The Panhards were immune to most of the German fire power, but the poor motorcyclists were not.  Heavy fire was thrown on them, disrupting their cohesion, routing one of the bikes and causing another to dismount.  The French took some hits to their Force Morale, but it was to late.  They got a double phase not far from tables edge and made good their escape.  The French had one, but it was close.

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The next scenario was Den Ganzen Lieban  Langen Tag.  A scenario designed around the fighting at Crehen.  The scenario’s name comes from a quote of Panzer Captain Von Jugenfeld who said the fighting continued all the love longed day.

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Crehen

This was a far more typical Chain of Command game with two platoons fighting for possession of Crehen. The French were aided by two Hotchkiss H30s (one with an upgraded long SA 38) two Belgians gates and one minefield. The Germans had a Panzer Grenedier platoon with 6 command dice supported by two panzer IIs, a Panzer III, a pregame barrage and a mine clearing team.

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This looked rough for the Germans.  Most of the village is well over on the French side of the table.   There was also a series of walls and stone structures forming a formidable looking barriers across the field.  The French placed the Belgian Gate and the mine fields in the most prominent gaps.  The Germans however were far more aggressive than the French in the patrol phase and managed to get jump of marker very far forward, allowing them to take some of the buildings easier than might have been imagined.

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Firefight

One of these positions was a house just across the road from the petrol station and a fierce firefight began.  The Germans never really committed their rifles to this action, but the MG 34s were doing fine as it was.

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On the German’s left, they sent their two Panzer IIs to rip into the other primary French position, again to very good effect.

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The French responded by dividing their Hotchkiss tanks.  sending one forward to support the firefight at the Shell, and the other to deal with the Panzer IIs.  Another squad was also ordered into the Petrol station to support that first squad which had taken heavy casualties this was a huge error.  As the darted across the street, the Germans played their Chain of Command dice and interrupted the action, catching that squad flat footed in the road at close range.  The were ripped apart.  In two phases, the French Force Morale crashed from an already unsteady 5 to 0 and the Germans took the town.

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The last  scenario deals with the crazy actions of Lieutenant Le Bel, who on the 13th of May would drive his Hotchkiss through the German lines surrounding Jauche not once, but THREE times.

This scenario is problematic.  The idea sounds  kind of fun, at Le Bell’s story is great.  as written however, the French are only required to drive two Hotchkiss tanks across the board.  Now that might not sound so tough but all the German’s have to stop them is part of a Panzer Grenadier platoon, a Panzer I, a Panzer II and a PAK 36.  The only weapons really likely to do anything to a Hotchkiss is the possibly the PAK 36 and to a lesser degree the Panzer II and the platoons Anti Tank Rifle.  I decided to give them a panzerknacker team as well.  Little damage was done to the French tanks, though there was some success in slowing their progress.

The Panzer I was mostly useless.  Or so I thought.  In the end, with the Hotchkiss tanks a good deal of the way to their objective, the obsolete little German tank raced forward and rammed one of the French vehicles.  I didn’t even know their were rules for this in Chain of Command.  The Panzer suffered more from the crash than did the Hotchkiss, as one might imagine, but in a ram the victor still rolls on the plus 2 net hit chart and the result was an immobilized Tank.  As the victory conditions called for both tanks to make it this gave the German’s the victory!

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Every one seemed to have a good time and the majority of my players were in all three games!  Thanks for playing and thanks to Lard America for this little taste of Yankee Lard.

Until next time, Cheers!

 

Categories: Chain of Command, Convention, Fall of France, Historicon, Lard America, Too Fat Lardies | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

What a Tanker at the Club

Tonight we tried The Too Fat Lardies newest game, WHAT A TANKER. What a Tanker is a fun, quick paced game of tank to tank combat in World War Two. It is designed for any models ranging from 10mm up to 1:48, which was the scale we chose. We had five players, and after far too […]

via What A Tanker! — Williamsburg Legati

Categories: Too Fat Lardies, Wargaming, What a Tanker, Williamsburg Legati, World War II | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Christmas Loot!

Well, another Christmas has come and gone and we have done very well here at Cry Havoc!

I will begin with the required post.  For the last few years,l I have participated in the Secret Santa program organized by Catherine and Ian over at THE BLOG WITH NO NAME.  this is a lot of fun.  The way it works is a number of us wargaming bloggers share are information and post ideas of things we would like for about 15 GBP.  Catherine assigns us people in some unknown magical fashion and we secretly send our little packages to our assigned target.

My gift just arrived today, a little late.  I only mention this because one, my odd sense of humor finds it intriguing that these little guys were cast in England, sent off to Germany and then finally here to the United States!  They have yet to see battle but they are already well traveled.

Secondly, I have been informed that they were sent late due to a family illness at Christmas.  I wanted to share my hopes and wishes for the best of all health to you, whoever are.  I know some of the blogging community have been greatly challenged with illness this Christmas Season, and whether serious or slight I hope that you and yours are doing as well as you might.

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Two packs of fine Perry Brothers miniatures.  One Queen’s Rangers Command and one Queen’s Rangers Light Infantry.  these are destined to be the start of my new project, focussing on Benedict Arnold’ invasion of Virginia in 1781.  the Queen’s Rangers will my  Main Force for this Sharp Practice campaign using Dawns and Departures.  Thank for sending me these and thanks to Cath and Ian for continuing this Yule tradition!

I also received a number of things from Charlie Foxtrot Models.  The huge Georgian mansion, a porch house, the stone barn I have so long wanted and his pig sty.  I also received the driveway, pond and entrance gate to match the Georgian house.  More on these will appear here later.  These are mostly to be used for Chain of Command but I am sure some of them will find themselves serving double duty.

From Sally 4th, for my 7TV THE BEAT game, I have some new photorealistic row houses a Pub and Corner Store.  These are really nice and I am slowly seeing the Greendock take shape.

I am still awaiting my Blood and Plunder Kickstarter, which should arrive any day.  I know they are being fulfilled and look forward to getting mine with great anticipation.  Lastly, I have some more stuff from Colin at Charlie Foxtrot on its way, most notably his new Tidewater House that I linked to in my last post.  That is a project that I have been involved with and am very chuffed to see it come to fruition.  More on that here later as well.

Cheers, and Happy New Year!

Ron

 

Categories: Chain of Command, Charlie Foxtrot Models, Crooked dice, Secret Santa, Sharp Practice, Terrain, The Beat, Too Fat Lardies, Wargaming | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

French World War Two Vehicles from Mad Bob

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Recently I participated in the Mad Mob Miniatures Kickstarter for French or former French vehicles.  This was really a no-brainer for me since I really needed one of the elusive German 7.5cm PAK auf Somua conversions for Too Fat Lardies campaign supplement KAMPFGRUPPE VON LUCK.  I do regularly  run Fall of France games for Chain of Command so some pre-converted  half-tracks would prove useful as well.  (Besides those French half-tracks are just the thing for a desert based Pulp Game!)

I have done business with Mad Bob before, when I bought my German converted Lorraine Schlepper and had been pleased so no risk there.

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The Mad Bob piece is the one in the foreground.  The other is a Warlord Marder that has been standing in for the new Somua

The Kickstarter levels were arranged by the number of vehicles you wanted to buy with no need for a decision on what those would be until sometime after the conclusion.  The Kickstarter was very successful and many stretch goal vehicles were added.  That was very important to me as one of the vehicles I most wanted was itself a stretch goal.

Furthermore, when the Kickstarter finished, Mad Bob allowed us to add any of the other vehicles to or order at the Kickstarter rate which while I did not, in the end, do so,  I certainly considered it.  I think that was a great offer and pleased that it was available.

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So my order did arrive this week.  Three half-tracks.  two were the French models, a standard P19 and a Staff model.  The other was the aforementioned and longed for Somua conversion.  All three models have very little flash and very crisp details (much better than it appears in some of these photos).

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The P19 VDP is the basic French troop transport half track.  The model consists of three pieces, the body, the windscreen and the canvas roof.  Mine arrived broken, with the some of the pieces meant to support the roof gone.  In the picture, the remaining ones have been removed by myself.  I will either build it without the roof or scratch build replacements.  Not difficult but a shame that might have been prevented by better packaging.

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staff-car The next model is the Staff car version, P19 VLTT. This model consists of four pieces,  the body, roof, windscreen, and a spare tire.

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somua And lastly, the point of the exercise, the 7.5 cm PAK auf Somua.  This model is very nice.  Mine arrived with the barrel a little bent, but a simple soak in warm water allowed that to be repaired.  This model is composed of six parts, but none of them are very fiddly and it looks like it will all go together well.  It is going to be beautiful when all painted, decaled and weathered.  So now I am off to do that!

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If you do early war, or might need some of the odd French conversions, I certainly suggest you take a look at Mad Bob Miniatures.  He does good work and a number of his offerings are unusual and hard to find models.

Cheers,

Ron

Categories: Chain of Command, Fall of France, Mad Bob Minatures, pulp alley, Review, Too Fat Lardies, Uncategorized, Wargaming, World War II | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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